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We Break Down the Reality of Feeding With Our Team of Feeding and Medical Experts

WHAT GOES IN . . . MUST COME OUT

💩 Poop

Did you know:

An infant's poop will change color and consistency 5 times over the first year.

0-2 weeks

Is greenish/black and looks like tar.

1-4 Months

Yellow/brown and looks like peanut butter. Warning: This is peak diaper blowout stage!

4-6 Months

Adult-like turds: firmer, darker and smellier.

6-12 Months

Fewer, larger poops and changing consistency with solid foods.

🤤 Spit Up

Did you know:

It’s normal for babies to spit up 3 or more times during or right after a feed. Dribble and stains on the shoulder of your shirt? Normal.

0-2 weeks

Most newborns will spit up during burping with a feed.

1-4 Months

Peak spit up is with reflux at 4 months old. 

4-6 Months

Introduction of solids brings new meaning to spit up.

6-12 Months

Spit up usually goes away by 9-12 months. 

💨 Gas

Did you know:

Babies can be fussy whether they are breast or formula fed. If breastfeeding, caffeine or dairy products in a diet may irritate the baby's stomach. If formula feeding milk protein can sometimes cause tummy distress.

0-2 weeks

Digestive system is still forming; spit up after and in between feeds is normal.

1-4 Months

Warning! Baby hits peak fussiness post feeding, most often from swallowing too much air.

4-6 Months

Introduction of new foods will bring new gas (and new smells!) Veggies and high fiber foods can actually cause the most gas!

6-12 Months

Fussiness after eating should be at an all time low. Teething? That’s another story.

All parents have them. That’s normal, too.

The Universal Feeding Freakouts

Pediatrician, Dr. Jacq, weighs in on the most common parent feeding anxieties. We want to reduce that anxiety and share what is normal.

“My baby spits up after a bottle.”

That’s Normal.

Most babies spit up! If your baby goes from boob to bottle, avoid overfeeding to prevent extra spit ups.

“My baby hasn’t pooped.”

That’s Normal.

Babies can have a wide range of pooping schedules- from multiple times a day to every few days- all can be normal!

“My baby has acne.”

That’s Normal.

It's not just moms, newborns are going through hormonal changes too!

“My baby is crying after eating.”

That’s Normal.

Most common issue is gas. Infants should be burped twice during a feed.

Maternal instinct is the most important. When you feel something is not normal, ask a Pediatrician.
Take our Quiz

Is this normal or not?

Area of Concern
Feeding Method
Age
Select one item from each of the three categories and one of our Bobbie experts will provide an answer.

The content on this site is for informational purposes only and not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Discuss any health or feeding concerns with your infant's pediatrician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay it based on the content on this page.
This Is Normal!

50% of babies regularly spit up before 6 months of age. The peak age for spitting up – also known as reflux – is 4 months.

Using an age appropriate nipple minimizes overfeeding, paces the feeding and reduces spit up.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This Is Normal!

Spit up peaks at 4-5mths and tapers off by 9-12mths.

Introducing solids at 6 months of age and older usually eases reflux symptoms but the introduction of food also creates more opportunity for babies to 'spit up' what they don't like.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant
This Is Normal!

50% babies spit up regularly before 6 months. The peak age for spitting up – also known as reflux – is 4 months.

Babies who are fed in an upright position and burped intermittently as well as at the end experience less spit up. Additionally, using an age appropriate nipple minimizes overfeeding, paces the feeding and reduces spit up.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This Is Normal!

Whether you're supplementing or exclusively using formula, you will not see much of a difference. Spit up peaks at 4-5mths and tapers off by 9-12mths.

Introducing solids at 6 months of age and older usually eases reflux symptoms. However, the introduction of food also creates more opportunity for babies to 'spit up' what they don't like.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant
This Is Normal!

Babies under 6mths experience changes in poop color, consistency and frequency. A baby who is exclusively formula fed will typically have less frequent, yellowish green or brown poop with a pasty texture that is slightly odorous.

Blackish red or white poop however, warrants a call to the pediatrician.

Note: Heat, stress and other environmental factors can lead to constipation.

Tiffani Ghere Pediatric Dietician
This Is Normal!

Babies over 6mths who are now consuming solids will experience variances and regular changes in their poop. Pretty much any color and texture goes!

There's usually no difference at this point whether your baby is exclusively drinking formula or supplementing breastmilk with formula.

Tiffani Ghere Pediatric Dietician
This Is Normal!

The introduction of formula to supplement breastmilk will cause a change in poop odor, consistency and frequency. This is all normal.

By the time they’re about a month old, babies are pretty good at absorbing all the breast milk they drink. As such, they may pass a few soft stools each day or just one soft stool every few days. Sometimes, a baby might not poop for up to two weeks, and that’s still considered normal.

Tiffani Ghere Pediatric Dietician
This Is Normal!

Babies over 6mths who are starting to consume solids will experience a variety of changes in their poop. Depending on what they ate, pretty much any color and texture goes! There's usually no discernible difference in poop whether your baby is exclusively drinking formula or a combination of breastmilk and formula.

Tiffani Ghere Pediatric Dietician
This is normal!

Babies have sensitive skin. Most skin reactions are totally benign and will resolve themselves over time. Baby acne can be aggravated by residual breast milk, formula or spit-up on the skin. Focusing on keeping the mouth and neck area clean and dry helps minimize possible feeding related skin reactions.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This is normal!

At least 1 in 10 children have eczema - a common genetic skin problem that can make your baby's skin red, itchy, and sore. Baby acne can also be aggravated by residual breast milk, formula or spit-up on the skin. Focusing on keeping the mouth and neck area clean and dry helps minimize possible feeding related skin reactions.

In addition, the introduction of solids at 6 months or older can cause allergic skin reactions. Consult with a pediatrician if you suspect your baby has a food sensitivity.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This is normal!

Babies have sensitive skin. Most skin reactions are totally benign and will resolve themselves over time. Baby acne can be aggravated by residual breast milk, formula or spit-up on the skin. Focusing on keeping the mouth and neck area clean and dry helps minimize possible feeding related skin reactions.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This is normal!

At least 1 in 10 children have eczema - a common genetic skin problem that can make your baby's skin red, itchy, and sore. Baby acne can also be aggravated by residual breast milk, formula or spit-up on the skin. Focusing on keeping the mouth and neck area clean and dry helps minimize possible feeding related skin reactions.

In addition, the introduction of solids at 6 months or older can cause allergic skin reactions. Consult with a pediatrician if you suspect your baby has a food sensitivity.

Dr. Jacq Winkelmann Pediatrician
This is normal!

All babies cry! Crying is most frequent in infants between 2 weeks and 4 months of age. This is how they communicate to let you know if they are hungry, wet, hot, cold, over or understimulated. Babies under 3 months are not neurologically mature enough to soothe themselves. At this age, they are usually comforted by sucking and being swaddled.

Although less common, milk protein in formula may sometimes cause tummy distress and allergic skin reactions in infants with milk allergies. Consult with your pediatrician if you suspect this.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant
This is normal!

All babies cry! This is how they communicate to let you know if they are hungry, wet, gassy, hot, cold, over or understimulated.

Fussiness during or after feeding can be a sign of satiety, excess gas or in rarer cases, a food sensitivity. Although less common, milk protein in formula may cause tummy distress or allergic skin reactions in infants with milk allergies. Consult with your pediatrician if you suspect this.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant
This is normal!

All babies cry! Crying is most frequent in infants between 2 weeks and 4 months of age. This is how they communicate. Babies under 3 months are not neurologically mature enough to soothe themselves. At this age, they are usually comforted by sucking and being swaddled.

Fussiness during or after feeding can be a sign of fullness, excess gas or in rarer cases, a food sensitivity. If you are breastfeeding, caffeine or dairy products in your diet may irritate your baby's stomach. If you are formula feeding, milk protein may cause tummy distress in infants with milk allergies. Consult with your pediatrician if you suspect this.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant
This is normal!

All babies cry! This is how they communicate to let you know if they are hungry, wet, gassy, hot, cold, over or understimulated.

Fussiness during or after feeding can be a sign of satiety, excess gas or in rarer cases, a food sensitivity. If you are breastfeeding, caffeine or dairy products in your diet may irritate your baby's stomach. If you are formula feeding, milk protein may cause tummy distress or skin reactions in infants with milk allergies. Consult with your pediatrician if you suspect this.

Sally Johnson Lactation Consultant

Case Studies

Let’s Talk Lactose Intolerance

A lot of parents jump to the conclusion that their baby is lactose intolerant at the first sign of spit up, but what are the signs you should really watch out for? Jadah Parks Chatterjee, RN and IBCLC walks us through a case study.

Let’s Talk Fussiness

Gas? Burps? Too many swaddles? Cold? Hungry? RN and Lactation Consultant, Jadah Parks Chatterjee, dishes on fussiness and what to think through when your little one grunts and cries.

Let’s Talk Poop

Jadah Parks Chatterjee RN, IBCLC, walks us through a baby that didn’t poop for four days and what to expect in the diaper from a poop that smells like cake to poop that looks like peanut butter.

Need More Info? We Got You.

Check out our editorial site for all things feeding:

Milk-Drunk.com

Or text our Support + Wellness team with any questions on Bobbie or feeding basics:

415-854-2500